Upvoted by Alyssa Heitlinger and 19 others
kevin-chun

Chief Culinary Officer/ Chef Partner Honeybrains

Kevin Chun

Chief Culinary Officer/ Chef Partner Honeybrains

Answer found helpful by Kellie Norris and 27 others

Chicken Livers. Despite the sour faces some people may make about
this underrated item, it is indeed the secret ingredient to many
delectable dishes and sauces. With foie gras being so popular, you
would expect that many diners would be more apt to finding the same
love towards chicken livers. Sadly, this isn't the case. The
experienced diner will be the first one to order a chicken liver pate
if it is on the menu, while most will veer clearly away from this
seemingly unapproachable item. In my "dirty" bolognaise, I use equal
parts of chopped Chicken Livers to Ground Lamb and Veal. It adds a
richness and depth to the dish, that can not be equaled if you were to
just use various ground meats. The savory and earthy flavors the
livers impart as well as the creamy texture, are attributes any great
chef would be happy to fit into their menu when appropriate.

Helpful 28 Comments (3)
donald-li

Asian food master

Donald Li

Love that you're giving props to the chicken liver. Looks like an awesome dish!

Reply over 1 year ago

kathleen-jacobs

Aspiring chef, food blogger

Kathleen Jacobs

Your description certainly does the photo justice - this looks like a really interesting bolognaise that I'd love to try

Reply over 1 year ago

kellie-norris

Kellie Norris

Manhattan

@kelsojeann

Current wine rep for Savio Soares Selections and bartender at Sweet Chick Ludlow. Past lives include The Modern, Craft and Raines Law Room.

Kellie Norris

That sounds delicious!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Daniela Garcia and 20 others
anthony-ricco

Executive Chef at Spice Market

Anthony Ricco

Executive Chef at Spice Market

Answer found helpful by Debbie Kommer and 24 others

We are working with Hawthorn Berry. We made an apple compote with cardamom and cinnamon and piped it into cinnamon meringues with a piece of berry on the side which gives the flavor of apple skin so all together it tastes like your eating a sweet honey crisp apple with the skin on.

Helpful 25 Comments (5)
kerry-smith

Kerry Smith

New York

When life gives you limes, just add tequila

Kerry Smith

Wow does this look amazing! What a great sounding combination of ingredients.

Reply over 1 year ago

Brice Vermeiren

Will have to stop by to check this out, nice work!

Reply over 1 year ago

anita-malhotra

Any time's a good time for a margarita

Anita Malhotra

This looks awesome, and beautiful photo too!

Reply over 1 year ago

sayat-ozyilmaz

Sayat Özyılmaz

San Francisco

https://www.instagram.com/lauraandsayat/

Moved to San Francisco, doing Istanbul-themed pop-ups every week with my wife at www.feastly.com/lauraandsayat

Sayat Özyılmaz

Incredible! Hawthorn berries are commonly enjoyed in their native Caucasus from Iran to Georgia to Turkey. One of the original sherbets of the Ottoman Palace was infused with Hawtorn Berries. The fruit is going through a revival right now but it had been forgotten for a long time.

Reply over 1 year ago

jenny-lee

Jenny Lee

NYC

HTTPS://Instagram.com/pastrylovejen

Pastry Chef, Entrepenuer, Positivity

Jenny Lee

It looks and sounds awesome :) yum!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Michael Gitlevich and 15 others
julian-alonzo

Julian Alonzo

New York City

Executive Chef Hudson Garden Grill; SCG

Julian Alonzo

Executive Chef Hudson Garden Grill; SCG

Answer found helpful by Michael Gitlevich and 18 others

Right now at the restaurant, I am currently working with fresh wasabi root. I love using this ingredient for raw preparations, as it gives seafood a clean-unique bite. The root is expensive, but a little goes a long way.

Posted is a picture of my cucumber wrapped tuna tartar with fresh wasabi root. The heat from the wasabi blends well with the fresh tuna, sweet mango and boldness of the ketjup manis.

Helpful 19 Comments (3)
dana-silverstein

Midwest girl, love to cook and dine out in NYC!

Dana Silverstein

That looks as beautiful as it does delicious!

Reply over 1 year ago

kayla-chang

Kayla Chang

New York City

Born in Hong Kong, Instagramaholic

Kayla Chang

That is truly a work of art! I would almost be hesitant to take my first bite into that... almost :)

Reply over 1 year ago

kerry-smith

Kerry Smith

New York

When life gives you limes, just add tequila

Kerry Smith

Lovely! May I ask where you source the wasabi root from?

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Francis Barnes and 15 others
126 W 13th St, New York, NY
enzo-neri

Executive Chef at Gradisca Restaurant

Enzo Neri

Executive Chef at Gradisca Restaurant

Answer found helpful by Robert Friedman and 24 others

Fabbri company gave me some amarena cherries and asked for a dish. My mind went straight back to my childhood where I was addicted to a creamy lollipop gelato, covered with chocolate and hazelnut crumble and filled with amarena compote. Here I come, combining sweet and savory and served as an entrée with the look of a gelato, a roasted venison in spicy dark chocolate sauce and hazelnut crumbled grain, amarena compote and celeriac puree.

Helpful 25 Comments (3)
alyssa-heitlinger

Private chef specializing in Italian, French

Alyssa Heitlinger

Oh wow that is amazing. I love the combination of ingredients!

Reply over 1 year ago

daniela-garcia

If you like it then you shoulda put sriracha on it

Daniela Garcia

Loved hearing about the inspiration for this, thanks Enzo!

Reply over 1 year ago

claire-hawthorne

Writer, culinary adventurer, originally from North Carolina

Claire Hawthorne

Looks as beautiful as I'm sure it tastes!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Julie Barbera and 14 others
matt-conroy

Executive Chef at Little Prince Bistro

Matt Conroy

Executive Chef at Little Prince Bistro

Answer found helpful by Michael Gitlevich and 24 others

Right now we are using black sesame paste that i found in a Japanese market to make a pastry curd out of. Once we add sugar the paste it looks and taste just like peanut butter which we thought would be interesting to add to concord grapes for a fall dessert. We just made a riff on a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Helpful 25 Comments (3)
ashley-belin

Cheap eats to fine dining and everything in between

Ashley Belin

This is so awesome! Such a cool take on the PB & J!

Reply over 1 year ago

cynthia-mcgowan

Journalist, aspiring food critic, amateur cook

Cynthia McGowan

What interesting ingredients in this I'd love to try :)

Reply over 1 year ago

patrick-miller

patrick miller

Brooklyn

www.rucolabrooklyn.com

Chef de Cuisine, Partner at Rucola

patrick miller

Love black sesame, and am totally sure that tastes incredible. Nicely done!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Alyssa Heitlinger and 12 others
evan-mchalffey

Sous Chef at Inatteso Pizzabar Casano

Evan McHalffey

Sous Chef at Inatteso Pizzabar Casano

Answer found helpful by Daniel Halfman and 17 others

We try to keep everything as fresh and simple with as much soul as possible. During the fall one of our favorites is Treviso. I don't see that many people using it although it's incredibly versatile. We use it raw along side citrus and cheese, folded into soups and risotto as an herb element, grilled, roasted, smoked. One of our recent dishes featured it marinated in balsamic and black pepper then charred to cut the fatty roast suckling pig and creamy polenta it was accompanying.

Helpful 18 Comments (4)
kristin-cardoza

Mother first, chef second

Kristin Cardoza

love the descritpion! this sounds like something I'd love to try

Reply over 1 year ago

helen-johnson

Taking life one delicious bite at a time

Helen Johnson

Great work with this, love how you guys are using it

Reply over 1 year ago

claire-hawthorne

Writer, culinary adventurer, originally from North Carolina

Claire Hawthorne

Sounds wonderful hope you guys still have this available in the fall!

Reply over 1 year ago

kristel-arabian-cf7bad2b-37bd-4a85-9110-d476db712f62

Kristel Arabian

Brooklyn

www.CultureRecruiting.com

Ex chef, current culinary recruiter. Angelino living in NYC. Instagram: KrisKracks

Kristel Arabian

Love charred treviso. Yum!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Daniela Garcia and 11 others
190 Dean St, Brooklyn, NY
patrick-miller

patrick miller

Brooklyn

www.rucolabrooklyn.com

Chef de Cuisine, Partner at Rucola

patrick miller

Chef de Cuisine, Partner at Rucola

Answer found helpful by Lara Chang and 13 others

So Im late contributing and also mentioning something that's been around for awhile but whatever, its delicious! Black Garlic. I get whole pigs, butcher them to make porchetta, and slather it with a black garlic bagna cauda. We make the black garlic here, and puree it with fresh, blanched garlic, anchovies and olive oil. So yeah, black garlic bagna cauda. (Its all under that salad, I promise)

Helpful 14 Comments (5)
claire-hawthorne

Writer, culinary adventurer, originally from North Carolina

Claire Hawthorne

That looks SO good! I love the combination of ingredients, and beautifully plated as well!

Reply over 1 year ago

patrick-miller

patrick miller

Brooklyn

www.rucolabrooklyn.com

Chef de Cuisine, Partner at Rucola

patrick miller

Thanks Claire!

Reply over 1 year ago

Lauren Gold

Those are some impressive butchering skills! This looks like some delish porchetta.

Reply over 1 year ago

patrick-miller

patrick miller

Brooklyn

www.rucolabrooklyn.com

Chef de Cuisine, Partner at Rucola

patrick miller

Thanks Lauren!

Reply over 1 year ago

andrew-kim

Andrew Kim

New York

Craft beers and cooking are my passions

Andrew Kim

I am often trying to find places around the city that sell black garlic. It looks like you've put it to wonderful use, this looks delicious!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Daniela Garcia and 7 others
27 W 24th St, New York, NY
steven-hubbell

Executive Chef at Junoon Owner Devil's Larder Bitters

Steven Hubbell

Executive Chef at Junoon Owner Devil's Larder Bitters

Answer found helpful by Alyssa Heitlinger and 22 others

At the moment I'm all about kalonji seed. I've always loved kalonji for it's earthy, bitter flavor but, I've recently been introduced to kalonji oil while in the Middle East and was floored by it. Kalonji, also known as black onion seed, black cumin or nigella seed is from the Love in a Mist bush that has been cultivated for it's medicinal properties since ancient times in Turkey and Egypt. There are very few ayurvedic herbs which are as important as Kalonji, possessing more than 100 medicinal components. Medically, kalonji is used as an antiseptic and beneficial for many diseases like blood sugar, hypertension, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, boosts the immune system, etc... The plant is given even more importance in the Middle East as the Prophet Hazrat Muhammad has said that "Kalonji is the remedy for all diseases except death".

At Junoon we use it in a great deal of curries and pickle making because it's pleasantly bitter, slightly pungent in flavor and has an aroma similar to oregano. Since medicinally kalonji is ingested with honey or milk a great deal of the time we make a kalonji honey ice cream. Because of it's herbaceous aroma and mildly pungent flavor it's a natural pairing with lamb and goat. We have been developing a stone grilled lamb with a kalonji onion reduction and kalonji oil powder.

And bonus points, it helps with constipation, hair loss and skin care. Sadly, nothing about hangovers.

Helpful 23 Comments (5)
sarah-bridawitz

Coffee addict and proud

Sarah Bridawitz

Very cool! Are you willing / able to say where you source the kalonji seed from? :)

Reply over 1 year ago

robert-friedman

Wine lover, world traveler

Robert Friedman

I showed this to my wife, we're very excited to look out for Kalonji! Helpful to hear about how you're using it at Junoon.

Reply over 1 year ago

sayat-ozyilmaz

Sayat Özyılmaz

San Francisco

https://www.instagram.com/lauraandsayat/

Moved to San Francisco, doing Istanbul-themed pop-ups every week with my wife at www.feastly.com/lauraandsayat

Sayat Özyılmaz

In Armenian cuisine, we use it extensively in baked goods (e.g. choereg) and cheeses (string cheese, feta). Often as a finishing spice and not cooked. It's always great fun to see the overlap of Middle Eastern and Persian cuisine and Indian cuisine.

Reply over 1 year ago

steven-hubbell

Executive Chef at Junoon Owner Devil's Larder Bitters

Steven Hubbell

In NYC Kalustyans is a safe bet or ordering online is a breeze.

Reply over 1 year ago

steven-hubbell

Executive Chef at Junoon Owner Devil's Larder Bitters

Steven Hubbell

I can imagine how good kalonji and feta would be. Thank you for that. What are your recommendations fro Armenian restaurants?

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Katie Diehl and 6 others
31 Union Square W, New York, NY
sam-hazen

Culinary Director at BR Guest

sam hazen

Culinary Director at BR Guest

Answer found helpful by Alyssa Heitlinger and 9 others

We are getting a true Wild Belon direct from Maine, and what's truly unique is that we're getting it 24 hours out of the waters. We are serving them in all the BR Guest seafood concepts. From roasting them to serving with a Honey Crisp wasabi granite.

Helpful 10 Comments (1)
kristin-cardoza

Mother first, chef second

Kristin Cardoza

Incredible that they're so fresh. I'm stopping by!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Kelsey Ferro and 3 others
221 W Broadway, New York, NY
bobby-mcfarland

Line cook at White Street

Bobby McFarland

Line cook at White Street

Answer found helpful by Samantha Butler and 12 others

We use Mae Ploy sweet chili sauce in the dressing for a pea tendril and calamari salad. On it's own, Mae Ploy excels as a dipping sauce for fried foods. It has the clinging viscosity and sweetness of honey, but the specks of garlic and pickled chili suspended within suit it for savory applications. It's used often during family meal: tossed with crispy quartered Brussels sprouts or glazing beef or pork.

Helpful 13 Comments (2)
alyssa-heitlinger

Private chef specializing in Italian, French

Alyssa Heitlinger

'clinging viscosity and sweetness of honey'...loved that!

Reply about 1 year ago

gerardo-rodriguez

NYC bartender & specialty cocktail creationist

Gerardo Rodriguez

Awesome! Loved your description of this dish!

Reply about 1 year ago

Something missing from this list?
New Place