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What's a lesser known grape I should be trying this fall and where can I find it?

Please only mention wines that can be found at restaurants and wine bars around the city

Upvoted by Zach Gilson and 14 others
amy-mitchell

Sommelier @ Italienne

Amy Mitchell

Sommelier @ Italienne

Answer found helpful by Bill Venners and 18 others

Gramercy Tavern has a beautifully curated list that offers everything from the classics to the esoteric. If you are looking for adventure, Rkatsiteli, (pronounced R-kat-see-tell-ee), is a good way to go. Native of the Republic of Georgia, this ancient, aromatic, white grape is much easier to drink than pronounce. It is widely planted in Eastern Europe with only a handful of producers in America growing this grape. Dr. Konstantin Frank, also from Eastern Europe, is by far the most prominent. With its' floral, spicy, and mineral notes, there is versatility in pairing with food. At $10 a glass or $5.25 for a 3 oz pour, it doesn't hurt to take a chance. It is also nice to consume something that is locally produced. If you are still not sure how to pronounce it, you can always look it up on youtube.

Helpful 19 Comments (4)
marc-ramos

Private chef, specialize in latin american cuisine

Marc Ramos

So cool! I love the finger lakes rieslings I would love to try this.

Reply over 1 year ago

goldie-owens

Avid traveler and lover of all things with cheese

Goldie Owens

What an excellent recommendation. Is there something about upstate NY that is well suited for this grape?

Reply over 1 year ago

amy-mitchell

Sommelier @ Italienne

Amy Mitchell

Great question. Yes, Rkatsiteli does well in cold weather. It is a high acid grape that winemakers tend to harvest late so that the sugar counterbalances the acidity.

Reply over 1 year ago

katie-diehl

Life is too short to skip dessert

Katie Diehl

Most certainly a varietal I have not come across! Awesome!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Regina Myers Maganzini and 13 others
42 Grove St, New York, NY
luke-boland

Luke Boland

New York City

lukecboland.com

Wine Director at La Sirena

Luke Boland

Wine Director at La Sirena

Answer found helpful by Marie Florian and 24 others

Anyone who hasn't been to Buvette should go tonight after their shift is done. The place is open until 2 am and offers a cozy, rustic feeling French "gastrothèque" environment where the food is not fussy and the portions are generous. French classics dominate the menu here and nothing does a better job of versatility here than Aubert de Villaine's Aligoté. The wine is fresh with a gently fruity richness that just keeps begging for another glass with cheese, brandade, mussels, their amazing vegetable selections and even heartier fare like cassoulet. Last time I was here, the wine was only $40 a bottle, a price point that mean's with a group of friends I'll probably be drinking at least three. Aligoté certainly is a grape that gets shadowed by the powerhouse Chardonnay, but when in the hands of a master winemaker, it offers a precision and honesty that just works.

Helpful 25 Comments (2)
robert-friedman

Wine lover, world traveler

Robert Friedman

A perfect bottle to complement a wide variety of cuisine at Buvette. What a steal at $40! I'll be stopping by soon to give it a go.

Reply over 1 year ago

sarah-bridawitz

Coffee addict and proud

Sarah Bridawitz

I've been meaning to try Buvette what an excellent reason to stop by!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Michael Bastis and 13 others
85 10th Avenue, New York, NY
jose-valverde

Jose J Valverde

New York City

Sommelier at Toro NYC

Jose J Valverde

Sommelier at Toro NYC

Answer found helpful by Bill Venners and 21 others

Hailing from Sanlúcar de Barrameda in Jerez - the land of Sherry - we have the nearly-extinct grape varietal called TINTILLA. Alberto Orte from Compañía de Vinos del Atlántico produces this single-vineyard wine with a Vino de la Tierra de Cadiz designation.
Tintilla seems to be the ideal varietal to express the mineral and salty characteristics of the coastal albariza soils of this region. Atlantida is dark and juicy, with dark berries, floral notes, spices and tons of minerality; it finishes long with supple tannins. This is a limited-production red wine that everyone should try. Come to Toro in the Meat Packing District and try this exciting Spanish wine. It is $78/bottle.

Helpful 22 Comments (3)
donald-li

Asian food master

Donald Li

This looks incredible! Like the dark berries, spices and minerality I'd love to try this wine

Reply over 1 year ago

robert-friedman

Wine lover, world traveler

Robert Friedman

I haven't had Tintilla in years, I can't recall the last time seeing it on a wine list. Wonderful that you guys are offering it.

Reply over 1 year ago

jose-valverde

Jose J Valverde

New York City

Sommelier at Toro NYC

Jose J Valverde

It is a wonderful wine and it is only $78/bottle

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Anthony Jones and 12 others
andrea-morris

Andrea Morris

New York City

beverage director at Nix

Andrea Morris

beverage director at Nix

Answer found helpful by John Poiarkoff and 32 others

Romorantin! It's an old school grape only found in Cour-Cheverny, a tiny appellation located in the part Loire Valley where Chenin Blanc gives way to Sauvignon Blanc. Like so many Loire white wines, this one is all about texture, acid and the balance of savory notes with fruity ones. It's richer than most Sancerres and sometimes has a touch of rs which makes it incredibly food friendly and fun to drink.

The Pines in Brooklyn has Phillipe Tessier's Cour-Cheverny on their small but always creative and shockingly affordable list. Tessier actually ages his version in old Burgundy barrels, giving the wine power without overwhelming the citrus and apple-y flavors. A bottle of that, a bowl of their cabbage with maitake mushrooms and boar belly plus some bread and butter is exactly what I want for dinner this fall.

Helpful 33 Comments (3)
rich-dougherty

Ragin' Cajun

Rich Dougherty

So fun to read about, thanks for sharing!

Reply over 1 year ago

payal-daga

Studying in Paris ignited my love of French cuisine

Payal Daga

Well, I love the pines, so this is perfect for me. Sounds like a wonderful wine I'm going to check it out next time!

Reply over 1 year ago

sheila-mayo

Coffee addict and world traveler

Sheila Mayo

Your description makes this sound very inviting :)

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Zach Gilson and 11 others
Answer found helpful by Kayla Chang and 30 others

Blue Hill at Stone Barns has a wonderful assortment of classic wines, available at a wide range of price points fit for any budget. But its the collection that's slowly growing of lesser known wines that gives me reason to recommend the drive up and out of the city.
To pick just one selection is quiet difficult, and to be honest, its not that Assyrtiko is a lesser known grape. But the Domaine Hatzidakis Assyrtiko Nikteri (2012, Santorini, Greece) is certainly a lesser known style of the wine. These are grapes harvested only at night, when the acidity is at its peak. They are then macerated with their skins for 12 hours. The wine is matured in oak for about twelve months. Its certainly a viable replacement for a white Burgundy. Its a wine well worth trying. (Added bonus- Charles and Charlie have secured volcanic ash from Santorini and it is likely to sit on your table while you enjoy the bottle)
But if you aren't up for a full bottle of wine (perhaps you have to make the drive home), Charles Puglia has offered up some lesser known grapes by the glass as well that are worth a taste. One of the more recent additions being Adegas Triay's Godello coming out of Monterrei, Spain (2014), with others including a Grenache Gris from Bedrock Winery in McDowell Valley, CA and another Greek wine- Domaine Zafeirakis' Limniona IGT.
I'm certain even a quick look through their wine list will show you a few wines and grapes you've never heard of, or styles you are unfamiliar with (a white Pinot Noir out of Oregon). I'd recommend taking the train as opposed to driving up and sampling a few of their selections. Just look for Charles, he will likely be walking around the dining room with a rock in his hand.

Helpful 31 Comments (3)
robert-friedman

Wine lover, world traveler

Robert Friedman

Incredible post Daniella! Did you work at Stone Barns? Seems like you have the insider scoop there.

Reply over 1 year ago

Daniella Lauricella

I did.. I recently left to move to Australia. The boys there are doing incredible things and deserved a shout out for all of their hard work on the wine team.

Reply over 1 year ago

debbie-kommer

Big Apple food blogger

Debbie Kommer

I've only been to the Blue Hill in the city but you've convinced me that I need to make the trip out there!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Alexandre Calvi and 10 others
155 Varick Street, New York, NY
ian-roberts

Wino-Foodie Extraordinaire

Ian Roberts

Wino-Foodie Extraordinaire

Answer found helpful by James Schmitt and 23 others

Entering the spacious, contemporary rustic venue, we were greeted with a warm welcome, and an easy check-in. The legendary Gregg Allman Band is about to take the stage for the last night of their 5 night stint at City Winery. This 2009 Croatian Zweigelt was a leap of faith the first time around when Leon Russell performed last winter, and a no-brainer when Joseph Arthur performed this summer.

My guests and i surmised a Medium++ body with a flavor bouquet of dark stewed plums, blackberries, and chalky tannins that provided a memorably long finish. Priced at $55.00 for a 750ml bottle; Enjingi and City Winery are giving competitors a run for their money.

Here are the specs on this amazing deal:
Designation: Barrique
Varietal: Zweigelt, Other Red
Appellation: Kutjevo, Croatia
Winery: Enjingi
Alcohol: 14.2%
Production: 1,000 cases

Helpful 24 Comments (3)
raven-smithson

Media/PR, wine lover, cheese addict

Raven Smithson

I feel like City Winery is underrated as a concert venue, but I consistently love the shows they put on. So jealous you saw Greg Allman there! $55 dollars is a spectacular deal I might go back just to try this.

Reply over 1 year ago

Dani Hannah

I have never really heard much about Croatian wines, I find this fascinating! Thank you for sharing!

Reply over 1 year ago

Lindsey McPhee

Really enjoyed this thank you Ian!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Alec Steidl and 10 others
22 E 13th St, New York, NY
morgan-harris

Morgan Harris

New York

www.morganwharris.com

Sommelier at Aureole Restaurant

Morgan Harris

Sommelier at Aureole Restaurant

Answer found helpful by Katie Diehl and 25 others

Pelaverga is undoubtedly one of the great unsung Italian varieties. Grown in a very small pocket of Piedmont concentrated around the town of Verduno, it is by nature a labor of love. Much of the commune is permitted to produce the "more noble" Nebbiolo in the form of Barolo, which would fetch a much heftier price, but humble Pelaverga is still produced simply because producers love it.

Light in body, acid-driven and mostly red fruited (think pommegranite, mulberrry, or morello cherry), Pelaverga is shares a spiritual harmony with Beaujolais or fresher styles of Northern Rhone syrah, i.e. St. Joseph. Great Peleverga often has a low-level meaty quality, in addition to rose-and-violet florals, and spiced cinnamon stick, cardamom, or mace aroma that's varietally-driven, instead of from new oak.

G.B. Burlotto makes my favorite Pelaverga, but there are a number of other wonderful producers. Be on the lookout for for Castello di Verduno's "S-ciopet", a classical method sparkling Peleverga rose; it's not cheap, but it'll blow your face off with how goddamn delicious it is.

All'onda and most of the more adventurous Italian lists in town will feature at least one. Also, pretty much every Spanish-speaking FOH employee gets a chuckle when someone orders a bottle, because it nearly sounds like the dirty Spanish idiom, "De la verga."

Helpful 26 Comments (2)
lara-chang

Wish I could work as an ice cream tester for Ben & Jerry's

Lara Chang

Great choice! It's one of my favorite wines.

Reply over 1 year ago

sheila-mayo

Coffee addict and world traveler

Sheila Mayo

I enjoyed the backstory here, it makes it a lot more meaningful to taste something developed as a labor of love, as you put it. Thank you!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Daniela Garcia and 10 others
2 Lexington Ave, New York, NY
paul-aquino

Sommelier at Maialino

Paul Aquino

Sommelier at Maialino

Answer found helpful by Bill Venners and 19 others

"Imagine yourself walking the Monferrato Hills of northern Piemonte in the Autumn and coming upon a small hamlet or village in the fog. Upon entering, as a sign of welcome and respect, a villager hands you a glass of red wine to quench you're thirst. It is juicy, refreshing, peppery with blueberry, and blackberrry notes along with violets. This is Ruché."

Ruché is a red Italian wine grape variety from the Piedmont region. It is largely used in making Ruché di Castagnole Monferrato, a small production red varietal wine which was granted Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) status by presidential decree on October 22, 1987. The current DOC recognized area of production for the wine, covers only about 100 acres of vines around the villages of Castagnole Monferrato, Refrancore, Grana, Montemagno, Viarigi, Scurzolengo, and Portacamaro. Ruché di Castagnole Monferrato is, therefore, one of the lowest production varietal wines in Italy. Ruché di Castagnole Monferrato tends to be medium bodied with notes of pepper and wild berries and floral aromas on the nose. The wine is often characterized by moderate acidity and soft tannins. In the Piedmont region it is often paired with slow-cooked beef, northern Italian cheeses and mushrooms. I like to reccommend this to new world pinot noir drinkers, but this wine is unique in and of itself. At Maialino I like to pair this wine with Salumi, or our Malfatti pasta with braised suckling pig meat.

Paul

Helpful 20 Comments (3)
robert-friedman

Wine lover, world traveler

Robert Friedman

I feel like every day I discover a new Italian varietal. This sounds excellent, thanks for sharing!

Reply over 1 year ago

gianluca-elamir

I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.

Gianluca ElAmir

Love the sound of this with the Malfatti pasta + suckling pig :)

Reply over 1 year ago

kevin-malouf

Born in brooklyn, sampled cuisine from all over the world

Kevin Malouf

I've only had this varietal once but I'm glad you reminded me of it. I am a pinot noir lover and I did recall enjoying this quite a bit!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Jonah Rosen and 9 others
240 Central Park S, New York, NY
juan-quintero

Juan Quintero

New York City

Wine Director at Juni

Juan Quintero

Wine Director at Juni

Answer found helpful by Katie Diehl and 21 others

The restaurant? Marea

The grape? Sciaccarellu: perfumed with roses, light red, very mineral, tart red cherries, almost no tannin which makes it the perfect option to accompany fish if you don't like white wine, and a crispiness that would allow this wine to go with many dishes very easily. but, if you do like white wine only, my recommendation is Vitovska as a heavier option that has gone thru some skin contact to give it extra body and complexity.

Producer: Domaine Comte Abbatucci
Bottling: "Rouge Frais Imperial" 2013
The domaine was named after the General Jean-Charles Abbatucci from Ajaccio. He was a hero of the French Revolution and comrade in arms of another local hero, Napoléon Bonaparte. The domaine is run by Jean-Charles Abbatucci, a direct descendant of the General, who has now become a local hero of another kind

Helpful 22 Comments (2)

Patricia Dennis

This looks fantastic, thanks for the recommendation Juan!

Reply over 1 year ago

michael-gitlevich

Took photos of food before it was cool

Michael Gitlevich

Superb! Some of my favorite seafood in the city at Marea great to have a bottle to accompany it next time there!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Kristine Healy and 7 others
erin-healy

Erin Healy

New York City

https://www.instagram.com/moresaltandlard/

Sommelier, Restaurant Marc Forgione

Erin Healy

Sommelier, Restaurant Marc Forgione

Answer found helpful by Kristine Healy and 21 others

I'm loving red wines from the Jura lately, that are generally light, rustic, and funky. Try poulsard or trousseau (the French version of bastardo) from a range of producers at the Ten Bells, where Severine has put together an incredible selection of diverse and unique wines with an emphasis on natural wine making (which means less of a headache in the AM!).

Helpful 22 Comments (2)
payal-daga

Studying in Paris ignited my love of French cuisine

Payal Daga

I've been meaning to go to Ten Bells but I loved this bit of insight into the wine list there. Thank you!

Reply about 1 year ago

julia-martin

Food Enthusiast, Lawyer, Mother

Julia Martin

I've been looking for more options for places that serve natural wines this sounds like a nice spot

Reply about 1 year ago

Upvoted by Katie Diehl and 6 others
alec-steidl

Beverage Director, Strip House 12th Street

Alec Steidl

Beverage Director, Strip House 12th Street

Answer found helpful by Alex Wu and 20 others

You would never guess that there would be a subtle, fresh and lively red wine on a list at a steak house. That wine is this one. One word Frappato.

Rather unknown variety from the southeast of Sicily in the foothills of Mount Etna. Most often found balancing the bulk of the Nero d'Avola grape in the Cerasuolo di Vittoria. But by itself, it is a delicious, fruit foreward red without the cloying stickiness you would expect for a rather hot weather growing grape. Enough body to be drunk year round, it is a great aperitif in the winter. But, as summer approaches give it a bit of a chill and quaff it back on those days when nothing can cool you off.

Helpful 21 Comments (2)
neha-patel

Neha Patel

New York City

Event Coordinator, I research great places to eat for a living

Neha Patel

Impressive! It's nice to venture outside of the standard California Cab at a steakhouse :)

Reply over 1 year ago

julie-barbera

SoCal native, freelance writer

Julie Barbera

I immediately hopped onto wine-searcher to see if I could find this in any stores, it sounds fantastic!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Jonah Rosen and 6 others
rosario-toscano

Sommelier, Senior Wine Consultant at Morell and Co.

Rosario Toscano

Sommelier, Senior Wine Consultant at Morell and Co.

Answer found helpful by Morgan Theriault and 20 others

Not sure where else has this but I know does The Mark because I added to the list!
Domaine U Stiliccionu "Kalliste" 80% Sciaccarellu and 20% of the Niellucciu from Corsica. This cuvee is Stiliccionu's attempt at making a lighter bodied, elegant style of wine meant to be an ode to Pinot Noir. Kalliste means "most beautiful one" . Garnet color, and aromas of baked fruits, tobacco, and some smokiness. I think Corsica is still offering great values, and is fun to introduce someone to a region that most know do not make wine. The level of acidity in this wine also makes it easy to pair with a wide variety of foods however the Simple Grilled Pork Chop or Lamb Chops on The Marks menu is absolutely perfect with this.

Helpful 21 Comments (2)
miles-bernstein

Food photographer and writer

Miles Bernstein

With your description I can see the comparison to Pinot Noir. Sounds enticing!

Reply over 1 year ago

goldie-owens

Avid traveler and lover of all things with cheese

Goldie Owens

I live right by The Mark I'll have to go see if I can find a bottle of this :)

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Zach Barakat and 5 others
1593 1st Avenue, New York, NY
alex-berlingeri

Alex Berlingeri

Ho Ho Kus

www.sahospitalitygroup.com

Corporate Beverage Director SAhospitalitygroup Sant Ambroeus, Felice Wine Bars, Regency Grill, Casa Lever

Alex Berlingeri

Corporate Beverage Director SAhospitalitygroup Sant Ambroeus, Felice Wine Bars, Regency Grill, Casa Lever

Answer found helpful by Zach Barakat and 18 others

Nero Di Troia Parco Marano, Giancarlo Ceci 2011

Nero di Troia comes from Puglia in the south of Italy, it is planted usually in the northern part of the region and has always been regarded as a difficult grape to be made on it's own due to the fact that it is a late ripening grape (mid October) and has extremely aggressive tannins. in the last 15 years the amount of single varietal bottling's have gone from 2 to an estimated 80, the reason for this is the understanding on what is needed in order to produce a more balanced wine. This is achieved by not picking all the grapes at once during harvest, by controlling the maceration and reducing the time on the skins, softening the tannins by aging the wine in oak barrels and by letting the wine age longer in order to allow it to integrate those tannins. Producers have been able to present wine that are big bodied but well balanced with a long finish.

the Parco Marano has an intense and complex nose with notes of dry flowers and spicy dark sensations. Gentle on the palate with well integrated tannins and a long smooth finish. goes ideally with roasted meats and aged cheeses

Helpful 19 Comments (3)
neha-patel

Neha Patel

New York City

Event Coordinator, I research great places to eat for a living

Neha Patel

I would LOVE to try this! Really enjoyed your description!

Reply over 1 year ago

zaza-gilson

Part-time private chef, full-time foodie

Zach Gilson

This is definitely the first I've heard of Nero Di Troia but it sounds like something I'd love to drink. Fascinating that it's only recently been figured out how to be tamed.

Reply over 1 year ago

robert-friedman

Wine lover, world traveler

Robert Friedman

Bravo! This sounds time a true gem, I always appreciate something that's taken a bit more care and ingenuity to produce

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Shiloh Jackson and 6 others
philippe-sauriat

Wine Director / Dir. of Operations at The Lotos Club

Philippe Sauriat

Wine Director / Dir. of Operations at The Lotos Club

Answer found helpful by Katie Diehl and 19 others

Malagousia is definitely what came up to mind when I was asked to write about this question. I have been so impressed by the 100% Malagousia from Domaine Gerovassiliou , it has so much personality and elegance, it has a good weight to it with nice roundness. It's very aromatic (in a viognier sense), gentle touch of white peach. On the palate, it is more citrus and light mint/citronelle, white flowers and you can appreciate the length of this wine with a good potential for aging. The grape originated in the region of Nafpaktos in western Greece. Evangelos Gerovassiliou saved the Malagousia grape from extinction and I thank him for it. His vision is remarkable with all of his wines . Mylos on 55th street has their blend of Assyrtico/Malagousia, and their Sauvignon Blanc BTG and the 100% Malagousia on the list. This is a fantastic value and so appropriate for the fall!

Helpful 20 Comments (4)
josh-heyler

Pulled-pork and BBQ expert

Josh Heyler

Nice recommendation sounds like a very intriguing wine!

Reply over 1 year ago

virginie-bereznak

A balanced diet is a cookie in both hands.

Virginie Bereznak

Wow! I loved the history behind this thank you! I'd love to try

Reply over 1 year ago

sheila-mayo

Coffee addict and world traveler

Sheila Mayo

I've only had this varietal once but it left a distinct impression. Really nice to know where I can try it again!

Reply over 1 year ago

philippe-sauriat

Wine Director / Dir. of Operations at The Lotos Club

Philippe Sauriat

I'm glad you find it interesting!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Vlad Gaskarth and 4 others
kellie-norris

Kellie Norris

Manhattan

@kelsojeann

Current wine rep for Savio Soares Selections and bartender at Sweet Chick Ludlow. Past lives include The Modern, Craft and Raines Law Room.

Kellie Norris

Current wine rep for Savio Soares Selections and bartender at Sweet Chick Ludlow. Past lives include The Modern, Craft and Raines Law Room.

Answer found helpful by Ashley Belin and 12 others

I've recently made it my mission to get the wines from Bodega Barranco Oscuro out into the public. Manuel Valenzuela is a true pioneer in the wine making world. Since 1979, he's been making wine in Alpujarra, high in the Sierra de la Contaviesa mountains. His goal was to make wine that was a pure expression of the land it came from. He was an early champion of the organic and biodynamic movement, although he has decided that their current guidelines are not strict enough. He marches to the beat of his own drum, and as a result his wines are truly unique. The care and patience he shows his land is remarkable. He recovered a nearly extinct varietal (Vigiriega) and has recently released a still and sparkling offering. Both are exceptional. If you happen to be on the Upper West Side, swing by 67 Wines and visit Oscar Garcia! He's in charge of their Spanish wines (and champagnes!!) He has a wealth of knowledge and is delightful in general. Currently they have the Bodega Barranco Oscuro Brut Nature, the La Traviesa Blanco (both of which are made from 100% Vigiriega) as well as a Garnata (Which is also pretty, pretty good!)

Helpful 13 Comments (2)

Morgan Theriault

Cool! What are the characteristics of Vigiriega? Is it similar to any other varietals?

Reply over 1 year ago

kayla-chang

Kayla Chang

New York City

Born in Hong Kong, Instagramaholic

Kayla Chang

This is super helpful! I haven't learned much about Spanish wines but I'd love to try more!

Reply over 1 year ago

Upvoted by Kevin Malouf and 4 others
evan-mchalffey

Sous Chef at Inatteso Pizzabar Casano

Evan McHalffey

Sous Chef at Inatteso Pizzabar Casano

Answer found helpful by Alex Wu and 11 others

Our restaurant just spent the past two months constructing a brand new wine list for our customers. We did a lot of research and a lot of tasting, and while there was fun to be had, it proved to be very arduous, time consuming and exhausting work. One new wine we are happy to share with our cherished customers is the NANNI COPE 2013. It is a blend of pallagrello nero, aglianico and casavecchia grapes. All three grapes are very ancient varieties and indigenous to Campania. They are late ripening grapes, highly tannic and are also low yielding. This accounts for the less than 600 cases of wine produced under this vintage. The vintner is one of the smallest in the region but is rapidly becoming one of the most relevant. It is also quickly becoming a favorite here at Inatteso.

Helpful 12 Comments (3)
kayla-chang

Kayla Chang

New York City

Born in Hong Kong, Instagramaholic

Kayla Chang

Congrats on rolling out the new wine list! I love inatteso!

Reply over 1 year ago

kerry-smith

Kerry Smith

New York

When life gives you limes, just add tequila

Kerry Smith

Lovely! Do you guys have any dishes the Nanni Cope goes well with on the menu?

Reply over 1 year ago

evan-mchalffey

Sous Chef at Inatteso Pizzabar Casano

Evan McHalffey

Good question Kerry. We chose this wine specifically because it paired well with so many of our menu items. On our regular menu we offer a Certified Angus Beef strip steak with bitter greens and potatoes; a roasted half chicken with broccoli rabe, taggiasca olives, potatoes and jus; braised beef shank stew with creamy herbed polenta; fresh tagliatelle bolognese; and a classic lasagna bolognese. We also run a specials menu featuring between six and eight items that changes every three or four days. Our specialty at the restaurant is fresh pasta with braised meat ragus. Currently we have a braised Guinea Hen ragu with shiitake mushrooms, black olives and thyme; and a red wine braised lamb shank ragu with kale and crushed tomato. It is a bold wine that requires bold accompaniments. I hope this helps. I am always willing to talk food and wine, or just stop in our restaurant for a solid dining experience.

Reply over 1 year ago

Something missing from this list?
New Place